Guitarist Trish Chisholm of The End of the Ocean: music helped me find a community

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For Trish Chisholm, guitar player for the post-rock band, The End of the Ocean, it’s important to her that young girls and women everywhere know how important it is to live their passion. Chisholm is living this passion herself, and has been since the age of 12. That passion didn’t come without hardships or assumptions from bystanders, and while at first it was difficult to overcome these, she’s pushing through to continue her love of playing guitar. 

Chisholm’s band recently released their first album in seven years, titled  aire, via Equal Vision Records in January, and taking their show on the road with a tour to several different cities throughout the US. Chisholm has been playing guitar for 15 years and has endured several hardships along the way, in which music has always been a saving grace for her. She and fellow band member, keyboardist Tara Mayer, love to inspire all females who want to pick up a guitar and play to go for it! 

In our interview with Chisholm, she discusses how playing guitar and creating music has healed her, what she wants young girls and women who want to play music to know, her band’s new album in seven years, the women in music who inspire her, and she answers our quintessential fun favorites. 

I love your view on life and how music has helped heal you…can you share with our readers a bit of your journey to healing with music?

At first, music helped me find a community and made me feel like I belonged somewhere. I’ve met some of my best friends because of music. It wasn’t until I started playing music in bands where music really helped me through everything. It gave me a purpose for life. Also, there’s something about playing your guitar by yourself, in your room, when you’re going through something. That’s my therapy and has helped me a lot throughout the years. 

I also love that you and fellow band-member and keyboardist, Tara Mayer, are encouraging young girls to pursue their love of music. Why is championing this important to you both, and do you think that female musicians have made great stride through the years, or is there still a lot of work to be done?

I started playing shows when I was super young (think my first show was when I was 12). I was one of the only few girls in the local “scene,” and it was super weird going through that at such a young age. A lot of people didn’t take me seriously and always thought I was the merch girl or the girlfriend. I always put this pressure on myself that I have to prove myself and that I can actually play my instrument, which is not okay. It’s been a really hard learning process, but it has only made me more confident. Now, the scene is more welcoming to women, and I am seeing a lot more female musicians. I’ve had a lot of conversations with women who are afraid of doing music just because they are female. It breaks my heart because I know the exact feeling. I always make a point to talk to them and say to push back those boundaries and keep moving forward. It will be so rewarding for you. Plus, you shouldn’t let other people take your passion away from you. 

Your band, The End Of The Ocean, just released your first album in seven years, aire. Can you explain the delayed release, and what the writing and recording process was like with this release? Did the band have to familiarize with each other again, or was it like old times, falling back into the usual friendship and collaborative atmosphere?

We were all going through things outside of the band that delayed the process. We always wanted to write a new album but never found the right time. The writing process was interesting since I live three hours from everyone. So, I had to find the time to go to Columbus and write, which took us about two years to finish it. The recording process was all new to us. It was my first time recording with this band, but it all went super smooth. I think it was a little bit of both, familiar and unfamiliar. It helped that we’ve been playing together for years before we started writing. 

The band is also on tour promoting the new album…what do you like most about touring? 

TI like exploring and finding new food in whatever city we are in. Usually, our time is super limited, so any time we get to go do things is awesome. I also enjoy playing live, especially the new songs and meeting people at shows. 

Who are some of the most influential women in music for you, and specifically, guitar-playing? 

I really look up to Jax from Flint Eastwood. I grew up playing shows with her in the Detroit area, and she’s the most kind-hearted person I’ve ever met. She kills it and is always pushing her limits. Guitar-wise, I would say Lynn from PVRIS. I know she doesn’t play guitar all the time, but her songwriting is amazing. 

Fun Questions

Who was your first concert, and do you have an overall favorite, thus far?

I always went to local shows growing up, but I think my first “real” concert was The Blood Brothers. I recently saw The Story So Far, and that’s one of the best shows I’ve been to in a long time. 

What was your first album on cassette, CD or vinyl?

Sticks and Stones by New Found Glory was my first band CD. 

What five artists and/or albums would you not want to live without?

The Story So Far, Thursday, Thrice, Coldplay, and Taking Back Sunday.

Do you have a guilty music or entertainment pleasure? 

I love pop music. I know every Justin Bieber and One Direction song… I love catchy songs and ballads. My favorite artist right now is Khalid. I tell people I have the music taste of a 14-year-old girl.

Check out The End of The Ocean on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.”

Music video for the band’s single “bravado”

Photo courtesy of Artist

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